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Recently the CDC-sponsored analysis was reviewed in the March issue of American Journal of Preventive Medicine, the associated commentary by, Dr. Stan Weed, brings doubt to the effectiveness of comprehensive sex education. There were three areas in particular that bring forth questioning.

The first was the lack of evidence of the effectiveness of school-based comprehensive risk reduction programs (CRR) wasn’t reported. According to the NAEA (National Abstinence Education Association), “the article failed to report that the study found CRR programs did not produce significant effects on teen condom use, pregnancy, or STIs…”

Secondly, there were internal inconsistencies in the CRR results contradicting the claim of overall CRR effectiveness and renders the CRR results almost meaningless.

Finally the claim that CRR programs offer a health benefit that is superior to effective AE (abstinence education) programs is not supported by the CDC study data. Dr. Stan Weed explains it best in a part of his commentary, “only three of the 62 CRR studies provide evidence of effectiveness at increasing both rates of teen abstinence and condom use… and does not appear to constitute sufficient evidence for the assertion that the CRR strategy offers this dual effect and therefore provides greater public health benefits than the abstinence education strategy.”

How does this affect you or your family? Well, the outcome of this study just proves the importance of teens and young adults needing more encouragement and education to make a logical life changing decision to abstain from sex until marriage. The rise in HIV/AIDS and STIs are encouraging young adults to make a commitment to celibacy. The only defense to these diseases and teen pregnancy is ABSTINENCE.

Call to Action: Make a decision to pass the importance of celibacy on to your peers, family and community.

PLEASE NOTE: If you are interested in booking Delisha Easley for your next event please send an e-mail to dleunlimited@gmail.com for more information.

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